Nothing is easier than to denounce the evildoer; nothing is more difficult than to understand him. —Fyodor Dostoyevsky   Whenever we learn of an unspeakable crime, an incomprehensible act, there are questions. Chief among them: Why? What motivated this person? What was going on inside their head? How did they go from quiet and nerdy to hateful and violent? Were they isolated, disenfranchised, lost? Were they triggered or born a monster? We usually blame mental health issues, poor upbringing, bad wiring, and then we move on. Writers are encouraged to go deeper. In the book Characters, Emotions & Viewpoint, author Nancy Kress writes, “When writing villains, authors need to know the whys. Real human beings, villains included, have reasons for what they do. Villains can’t be…